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FL Senate Signs Off On Smokable Marijuana Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 11 March 2019 18:33
 
Dara Kam reports for News Service of Florida via Health News Florida on  Mar 8, 2019:
Bowing to a demand by Gov. Ron DeSantis, the Florida Senate on Thursday <3.7.19> overwhelmingly approved a measure that would allow patients to smoke medical marijuana if doctors deem it the proper treatment. Under the proposal, patients could buy up to 2.5 ounces of medical pot during a 35-day period and would be able to possess up to 4 ounces of cannabis at any given time. Smoking of medical cannabis --- which would have to be purchased from state-authorized operators --- would be banned in public places. The Senate's 34-4 vote in favor of the measure (SB 182) came two days after the start of the 2019 legislative session, and the House is expected to take up the measure Wednesday <3.13.19>.
Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>> https://conta.cc/2EW0kdt
 
Last Updated on Monday, 11 March 2019 18:38
 
Pharma Execs Dig in for a Fight Against Outraged Senators Print E-mail
Written by Emmarie Huetteman, Jay Hancock | KHN   
Wednesday, 27 February 2019 00:00
 
Senators got their first opportunity Tuesday to prod drugmakers about the wallet-emptying prices they charge for prescription drugs. Almost in unison, the executives expressed support for eliminating rebates that flow to industry middlemen instead of patients; for increasing transparency about how they set prices; for shifting to a more value-based pricing system, in which outcomes are rewarded. Together they demurred when asked to commit to lowering list prices on drugs like insulin and the blockbuster rheumatoid arthritis drug Humira. The drugmakers - AbbVie, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Pfizer and Sanofi - appeared before the Senate Finance Committee as lawmakers mull how to best control rising drug prices. 
 
 
Lab to Pay $63.5M to Settle Kickback Allegations Print E-mail
Written by Vitale Health Law   
Tuesday, 05 February 2019 18:19
 
Inform Diagnostics, an Irving, Texas-based pathology laboratory company, has agreed to pay $63.5 million to settle allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by  engaging in improper financial relationships with referring physicians. The settlement stems from allegations that the company violated the Anti-Kickback Statute and the Stark Lawby providing referring physicians with subsidies for electronic health records (EHR) systems and free or discounted technology consulting services. The Anti-Kickback Statute and the Stark Law restrict the financial relationships that health care providers, including laboratories, may have with doctors who refer patients to them.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 February 2019 18:21
 
MOC: When you play the game and they change the rules Print E-mail
Written by XRAYVSN, MD | KevinMD   
Tuesday, 29 January 2019 17:58
 
I think one of the biggest frustrations I have as a doctor is being at the mercy of people who either have no medical training or are so detached from medicine that they have lost touch with those on the front line. The American Board of Radiology (ABR) essentially governs over radiologists who typically need the important board-certified designation to find a place of employment. I have always played by the rules dictated by the ABR and have toed the line with whatever rules/mandates have come from high above. However, it seems like playing by the rules is indeed not enough as this particular board appears to continually change its stance on multiple issues.
 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 29 January 2019 17:59
 
Sponsor Showcase Print E-mail
Written by Sponsor   
Wednesday, 27 February 2019 00:00
 
bdo-ftl hc florida-health-industry ad 1-19
Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 February 2019 18:05
 


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